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How to Negotiate a Job Offer for an Internal Promotion


Step 1

Tell the person extending the job offer that you appreciate the opportunity to move forward in the company and explore a greater position of authority. Before accepting the promotion, ask to discuss the specifics of the job, including compensation and job duties and functions. Get the details in writing and ask for time to review the document.

Step 2

Conduct some background research into the role you’re being offered. Because of your existing job with the company, you may have an idea of what the position pays. Dig a little deeper and find the going rate for that role in your industry. You can find statistics through the U.S. Labor Department that will help to prepare you for negotiations.

Step 3

Meet with the individual offering the promotion and ask questions about the new position. This will help you clarify what is expected of you. From there, begin negotiations for any missing elements you believe you are entitled to. For example: “Based on the overview of job functions, I believe I would be better able to perform in this role if I had a part-time assistant,” or, “Because of the extensive travel involved with this job, I’d like to request an expense account and use of a company car.”

Step 4

Negotiate any discrepancies in the salary package being offered. You can use any number of arguments to your advantage, including your existing knowledge of the company, your education or experience, or inside information. For example: “It’s my understanding that the last person in this role earned a significantly higher salary. Can you tell me why there is such a discrepancy in what you’re offering me?” Or, “The starting salary for this position looks like it’s about 10 percent below national industry standards. Would you be open to an increase?”

Step 5

Decide in advance of what you will and won’t accept. Take into consideration whether your existing job will still be available if you turn down the promotion, or if there will be awkward tension if you refuse the role.

Step 6

Let the employer know of your final decision as soon as possible.

Ref:http://work.chron.com/negotiate-job-offer-internal-promotion-13231.html

 
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Posted by on January 2, 2013 in Personal

 

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How to Negotiate Salary Without Losing a Job Offer


Research

Before you attempt to negotiate a higher salary, research the average salary range for the position so that you’re well-informed during the discussion. Check salary ranges Labor Statistics website, research annual reports by industry and use reference materials available at libraries, such as the “Business Directory.” Because cost-of-living factors and geographical locations affect salaries, compare statistics that are representative of your area. Consider your years of experience in the industry, academic degrees and job-related accomplishments to help you come up with a counteroffer that’s fair and reasonable.

Professional Enthusiasm

During the negotiation process, make sure you discuss your salary needs with professional enthusiasm. Avoid criticizing the original offer, demanding better compensation or using a “pity party” mentality to manipulate the situation. The goal is to convey confidence and earnestly seek a compensation package that meets your skill level, years of experience and financial needs. Keep a positive attitude and don’t allow the negotiation process to become confrontational. If the company isn’t sincerely interested in you, they wouldn’t have offered you the job in the first place.

Bargaining Room

To make sure you don’t lose the job offer, express your willingness to give-and-take, so the employer doesn’t think you’re only interested if all of your expectations are met. According to the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, an effective negotiation strategy is to ask for a few perks you can do without. As a result, you can opt to give up those benefits in lieu of a higher salary. For example, you might cover your own relocation expenses, give up stock options for a year or forgo a company car to show your goodwill. This bargaining strategy seeks to find a compromise so both sides feel like they got a good deal.

Considerations

Several negotiating guidelines might help you strike a fair deal, without compromising the initial job offer. The Graduate College at the University of Illinois recommends negotiating salary only after a company has given you a formal offer. You need to make sure that the company is fully invested in you, so there’s no competition from other candidates. Don’t negotiate a higher salary unless you’re ready to commit to the job; the employer might agree to your salary request on the spot. Once salary negotiations have ended, don’t bring up other requests or demands that might negatively affect your standing as a new employee.

Ref:http://work.chron.com/negotiate-salary-losing-job-offer-8991.html

 
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Posted by on January 2, 2013 in Personal

 

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How To Negotiate Vacation Days in a Job Offer


Meeting

Schedule a face-to-face meeting with the recruiter or hiring manager to discuss the job offer. Negotiating is more effective in person because so much body language can be interpreted throughout the negotiation process. For your meeting, have two copies of the offer letter with you — a clean copy plus another copy that contains your notes and highlighted areas.

Interest

Before you begin negotiating the terms of the job offer, express your appreciation for the offer. Tell the recruiter that you’re looking forward to working for the organization. Say that you’re excited about your start date, and that it signifies the beginning of a rewarding and long-term relationship with the company. Lead into the negotiation process by stating, “I’m certainly looking forward to beginning my job here; however, I’d like to negotiate a few minor terms in the offer. I made notes and suggestions about the vacation terms I want to share with you.”

Terms

State the vacation time using the language contained in the job offer. Put the emphasis on those terms that appear to be negotiable, such as “can,” “might” and “may.” Ask the recruiter what you need to do to earn more vacation time beginning with your first day on the job.

Commitment

Explain that you’re a hard worker and that you typically put in more hours than average. If the job has a great deal of responsibility and authority, use that to support your position that you’ll work more than a 40-hour workweek based on your commitment level. Recall your previous jobs and share with the recruiter how much time you devote to your career. Tell her how seriously you take your responsibilities and that you’re the type of professional who doesn’t leave work behind just because the workday is over.

Concession

Ask if a slight salary reduction is a concession the company would accept in exchange for additional vacation days. Explain that you’d like more time to achieve a work-life balance and that you’re willing to exchange part of your salary for improving your quality of life. Reassure the recruiter that the salary reduction won’t diminish your attention to your job duties. If your research indicates that the salary you’re offered is below market value, use that to negotiate more vacation. Using this as a negotiation tool could be especially effective if you have another job offer for more money.

Ref:http://work.chron.com/negotiate-vacation-days-job-offer-6945.html

 
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Posted by on January 2, 2013 in Personal

 

Is the Job Title Negotiable in a Job Offer Negotiation?


Overview

Job titles can be confusing, particularly if the employee’s duties and responsibilities vary or if the employee works in two or more separate and distinct areas of the business. You’re well within your rights to ask if you can negotiate the job title for your new role if you have an idea for a title that more aptly describes the work that you perform. Your job title can affect your attitude about your job, the prestige and your career progression with the current organization as well as future employers.

Options

Consider the options, based on your duties and the impact of your job on the organization. For example, if you’re offered a new role as the human resources coordinator, yet your job duties involve handling all employment-related matters, you may want to negotiate for the title of HR manager or HR generalist. Granted, you may be coordinating many of the employment functions; however, your job may also include managing HR projects, assessing staffing needs and resolving workplace issues. Therefore, a title that accurately reflects your duties and your level of authority would be consistent with other management titles in the organization.

Preparation

The only way you’ll find out if the job title is negotiable is to ask, preferably before you accept the job. Before you start negotiating for another title, do your research. Access job postings and job descriptions for the job title in the offer and the job title you’re proposing. Give concrete reasons why you believe another job title is more appropriate. Examples of reasons include employees’ perceptions, the level of expertise required to perform the job tasks, your academic credentials or professional licenses, how much you influence change within the organization and your ability to make decisions on behalf of the organization.

Negotiation

Successful negotiations mean win-win results for both parties. During your negotiations, present your case for changing the job title and prepare for concessions you might have to make to get the employer to agree. Your future employer might tell you that you can have the title you want, but that the company can’t raise your salary for now. However, you’ll make a stronger case if you demonstrate how changing the title will benefit the company. Express your appreciation for the job offer before you propose changing the job title. For example, you could lead with, “Ms. Doe, thank you for the job offer to join your company. I appreciate your confidence in my talent and expertise; I’m looking forward to working with the HR team. I’d like to discuss the job title, though, because I’m not sure it truly reflects my job duties or authority. I have some ideas on how changing it will benefit the company and the HR department.”

Ref:http://work.chron.com/job-title-negotiable-job-offer-negotiation-11306.html

 
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Posted by on January 2, 2013 in Personal

 

The Process to Communicate a Change in Job Title


Employee

Communicating an employee’s new title is simple when the employee receives a promotion. The process first consists of informing the employee that she’s been selected for the promotion, the position’s official title and the date on which the change becomes effective. After communicating the change to the employee, encourage employees who work closely with her to congratulate the newly promoted employee. For job promotions that create a shift in leadership, significant changes to the employee’s responsibilities or transfer to a new site, the communication must reach the broader audience that includes more of the organization’s employees.

HRIS

Human resources information systems, or HRIS, maintain and store an organization’s employment data. Employee titles, salaries and wages, tenure and seniority are examples of employment information that HRIS contain. Process-oriented steps, such as updating employee records and making changes to the employee’s wage rate, are part of the communication and should be handled as soon as practicable.

Staff

Compose a memorandum and schedule an all-staff meeting if the employee whose title changed is moving to another business division or if the change signifies a move that substantially impacts the business. Discuss the change in title to employees who report to the employee, answer their questions about the title change and how it affects the employee’s responsibilities. Leave the door open for employees to seek further clarification once the employee transitions into a new role.

Media

High-profile announcements, such as a large corporation naming its new CEO or a director moving into a senior vice president role may be suitable for publication, depending on the company size, visibility and industry rank. Construct a press release to announce the title change and, if appropriate, briefly describe the employee’s previous roles within the company. This type of announcement might also contain information about the predecessor as well as the employee’s professional background and accomplishments.

Responsibilities

Changes in job titles don’t always reflect a promotion. They can be changes that occur due to restructuring, updates to the employment census or even a demotion. For example, companies that used the term clerk typists modified the titles for employees who handled administrative and clerical tasks. Titles commonly used to designate workers in these roles include administrative assistant, office associate or data specialist. Once companies start to modify their job titles across the board, an all-employee communication is essential. A proactive approach to clarifying roles and clearing up possible confusion is to issue the communication long before the effective date.

Ref:http://work.chron.com/process-communicate-change-job-title-7320.html

 
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Posted by on January 2, 2013 in Personal

 

How to Ask Your Boss for a Title Change


Compile a List of Achievements

Make a list or a folder of your achievements with the company that support your job title change request. For example, if you would like to change your job title from “Special Projects Manager” to “Special Projects and Marketing Manager,” make a list of tasks or projects you’ve headed up that deal directly with marketing. Include impressive statistics or other results you’ve achieved when utilizing your marketing abilities. In addition, include any advanced training or certifications you’ve acquired in your job and letters of commendation from supervisors, clients or peers.

Make a List of Reasons Why You Deserve the Title Change

You might have to sell your boss on your request for a title change, so prepare yourself. Think of all of the reasons why you deserve a different title. For instance, if you routinely do tasks outside of your job description, make a list of the tasks and include how they qualify you for a title change. In addition, think of how your title change could benefit the company. For example, if you request a title change from “Photography Assistant” to “Photography Projects Manager” note that the title has more authority and may give clients more confidence when dealing with you. This can relieve a certain amount of stress and pressure from an overworked photographer.

Choose Your Proposed Title Carefully

When dreaming up your new title, take politics into consideration, advises Tory Johnson, author and founder of the recruitment services company, Women for Hire, on her “Diversity in the Workplace” blog. Never aim for a title that is the same or similar to the title one of your superiors or you risk appearing as if you are belittling his role. And never choose a title that implies that you have a level of authority that you do not.

Set Up a Meeting

Blindsiding your boss with your job title request sets you up for failure. If it’s not a convenient time for her to consider and answer your question, she may brush it aside and leave you waiting endlessly for a response. If you want your boss to seriously consider your desire for a title change, send her an email and request a 30-minute meeting so you can discuss the issue. Mention in the email that you’d like to discuss changing your job title. You need some dedicated one-to-one time so you can present compelling and valid reasons for her to grant your request.

Ask to Revisit the Issue

If your boss doesn’t approve a title change, ask him what you need to do so that he will grant your request. He may say that you need to demonstrate higher levels of responsibility or learn to perform additional tasks. Ask him to meet with you again in six months to revisit the issue. Send him an email with your understanding of what you need to do. State that you will check in with him periodically regarding your progress and that you look forward to meeting with him regarding the title change in six months.

 

Ref: http://work.chron.com/ask-boss-title-change-3498.html

 
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Posted by on January 2, 2013 in Personal

 

How to Write Proposals for Job Title Changes


Step 1

Consider your reason for requesting a title change. Reasons may include increased responsibilities exceeding your current job title, meeting requirements for a higher-level position, filling a vacant position or lack of fit between your current responsibilities and job title. Also, determine whether your request also merits a raise in pay. Even without a higher salary, your job title affects how you are perceived; having the proper job title can make working with colleagues, customers and future employers easier.

Step 2

Format your proposal as a business letter. If you do not know to whom it should be addresses, use the salutation “To Whom It May Concern.”

Step 3

Begin the first paragraph of your proposal by outlining the responsibilities of your current job title. These are the responsibilities given to you when you were hired or the last time you received a promotion. Do not assume the person reading the proposal, whether in human resources or your supervisor, is familiar with what you were hired to do.

Step 4

Outline how your current daily responsibilities differ from those that are required under your job title. Although all employees are expected to pick up slack when needed, you may deserve a new job title if you are taking on responsibilities outside of the scope you were hired for. This may include doing additional tasks, overseeing a larger number of employees, taking over responsibilities for a vacant position or dealing with problems that weren’t anticipated when you were hired.

Step 5

Explain how your new proposed job title will help you do your job and help improve results for the company. For example, if you’re taking over additional responsibilities for client accounts, changing your title from “Account Representative” to “Account Manager” may benefit you when you’re interacting with clients. Your title should be congruent with your new responsibilities and the decisions that you are empowered to make, and should accurately represent your job to employees and clients alike.

Step 6

Submit your proposal to your company’s human resources department or your supervisor, whoever is the appropriate party. Be patient in awaiting a response, especially if your proposal is unsolicited.

 

Ref:http://work.chron.com/write-proposals-job-title-changes-6095.html

 
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Posted by on January 2, 2013 in Personal

 

How to Request a Change in Job Title


Step 1

Review your job description, the duties you perform and the purpose of your role within your department and the overall organization. List your major responsibilities and the priority of your job functions.

Step 2

Research job titles using resources available through Labor Statistics, college and university career websites, job advertisements and vacancy postings. Look for titles for job postings similar to your own job using keywords from your job description or some of the routine duties you perform. For example, if you’re an administrative assistant who coordinates executive board meetings and supervises junior-level administrative assistants, look for job postings that contain those duties.

Step 3

Meet with your manager to present your request for the title change. Explain how you arrived at the title you’ve chosen. If necessary, show your manager the information you gathered about the job title and the duties that title entails. Compare your skills to the skills required for the title you want. For example, if you’re an administrative assistant who performs high-level tasks that require interaction with the company’s chief executives, ask for a new title that reflects your work, such as executive assistant or executive administrative assistant.

Step 4

Ask your manager about the logistics of changing your title, such as when it becomes effective and how the announcement will be made to staff and management.

Ref:http://work.chron.com/write-proposals-job-title-changes-6095.html

 
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Posted by on January 2, 2013 in Personal

 

How to Write a Letter


The art of writing a letter takes practice, knowledge about proper form and the ability to put into words your feelings, thoughts, and/or ideas. If you learn the basic parts of a letter, it will help you to create letters for a variety of occasions.

Parts of the Letter:

Your address
At the top of your letter, you will put your address, so the reader will know where to send their reply to.

Date
Put the date on which the letter was written in the format Month Day Year i.e. June, 15, 2009.

Inside Address
The inside address is only required for a business letter and will include the address of the person you are writing to along with the name of the recipient, their title and company name. If you are not sure who the letter should be addressed to either leave it blank or try to put in a title, i.e. “Director of Human Resources”.

The Greeting
The greeting will address the individual that the letter is being sent to. This is usually completed in the form of “Dear Anne” or “Hey Anne”, for less formal letters.

The Introductory Paragraph
The first paragraph and will generally outline the purpose for the letter and the reason that the letter is being sent. This can address any issues that are outstanding and is used to set the tone for the entire rest of the letter. In this first paragraph, the summary of the letter can be found and the intentions which will be displayed through the rest of the letter should be outlined. From the first paragraph of the letter, the introductory paragraph, the individual should be able to note the tone of the letter.

The Body
The body of the letter will expand upon the introductory paragraph and the individual can extend their thoughts and feelings further when it comes to the letter. The body of the letter can be anywhere from multiple pages for personal letters, to one page or two pages for most business letters and other types of proposals.

The Closing
In the closing of the letter, the individual will close the letter and finish any thoughts that have been mentioned. The closing of the letter comes in various forms from yours truly, for those individuals that are familiar with one another, to a traditional sincerely which is a versatile closing that can be used in a variety of letters detailing many situations.

The Presentation of the Letter
The presentation of the letter can be hand-written for less formal letters that are addressed to friends and family members, especially thank-you letters. In the case that you have illegible handwriting, you may want to consider typing the letter in these cases, although proper etiquette dictates against this type of behavior.

Formal letters which are written on behalf of businesses to or professional contacts should remain typewritten and grammatical and spelling error free. These types of letters should be legible and professional and therefore typing the letter is one of the most effective ways to ensure that the letter demonstrates a professional appearance through the entire course of the letter, thereby creating a positive impression on the recipient of the letter.

As well as outward presentation, it is important to determine the tone which will be written in the letter, including a professional tone or a tone that will be taken with friends or family members in a more informal setting. Read through the letter once it has been completed to ensure that the tone remains the same. The tone can be adjusted based on the language which is used through the letter, as well as the greetings (familiar as opposed to formal).

Ref: http://www.letterwritingguide.com/howtowritealetter.htm

 
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Posted by on December 25, 2012 in Personal

 

Job Interview Thank You Letters


You should write a thank you letter as soon as possible (within 24 hours is recommended) after the job interview, at a minimum this should be done through email but is recommended that you do this through a hard-copy of a letter printed from your computer and mailed through the postal service. Hand written notes on thank you cards are also acceptable and good for short thank you notes.

A hard-copy thank you letter should be written in the business letter format, while an email should be sent in the same format but without the heading (your return address, their address, and the date).

Thank you letter writing
The first paragraph should consist of thanking the interviewer for the interviewing you (remind him/her about the position you interviewed for and the date of your interview). You can also include information about your impressions about the company.

The second paragraph should state your interests in the company and include any additional information about yourself that was not brought up in the interview which would make you a good candidate for the position. You can also emphasize your qualifications that were already discussed during the interview (don’t make this paragraph too long, try to keep it between 3-5 sentences, pick the traits that you think were most important to the interviewer and emphasize them).

The last paragraph should let the recruiter know that you expect to hear from them soon. Also let them know that you are available to come in again and are willing to discuss the job further. Write down your contact information again and what the best method and/or time to contact you is. To finish up the letter, thank them again for the interview.

Notes/Tips

  • A thank you letter shows that you have good business etiquette, your interest in the company and the position, and reiterates your positive qualifications to the interviewer so it should not be put off.
  • If there was more than one interviewer; write individual thank you letters to each of the interviewers (make sure each letter is unique). If it was a panel of interviewers interviewing you at the same time, you can send out one letter and address it to the head interviewer and the interview panel and thank them as one group.
  • If you forget the spelling or the names of the interviewers, simply call the company and request the proper spelling and title.
  • Keep the thank you letter brief; make sure the letter does not go past one page in length.
  • Check for proper grammar usage and spelling.

Ref: http://www.letterwritingguide.com/thankyouletters.htm

 
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Posted by on December 25, 2012 in Personal