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Category Archives: Human Resource Policies

Human Resource Policies are systems of codified decisions, established by an organization, to support administrative personnel functions, performance management, employee relations and resource planning.

Leave Policy for different sectors in India


What is the general leave policy in India? How many days Earned Leave (EL), Casual Leave (CL) and Sick Leave is one entitled to per year? These questions are often asked by employees/workers working in any organisation or office. Leave is different from holidays and days-off, since it aims to fulfil different objectives of work life sphere. However, there is always a confusion how much leave can one avail, what is one legally entitled to, the consequence of the same on wages/salary etc.

Employment laws set the umbrella framework for deciding different dimensions of leave, like category or types, eligibility, duration etc. Many companies and organizations categorise leaves in different categories like casual leave, sick leave, earned leave, maternity leave, special leaves, loss of pay leave, compensatory leave etc.

In case of employment contacts, where trade unions are involved in deciding employment contacts, leave rules are formulated in consultation with the unions. Such elaborate consultation is specified in The Industrial Employment Standing Orders Act which is formed for enforcement of different conditions of services.

In India, three types of leaves are generally followed namely earned leave, sick leave and casual leave. Different provisions exist under different laws, for different categories of leaves.

Details of each category are elaborated hereunder. While the Act specifies the broad framework, the notified rules under each legislation detail the implementation or applicability of these leave policies.

Quarantine Leave

This leave is usually granted to a concerned employee by reason of presence of an infectious disease in the family or household of the employee, if such disease is considered to be hazardous to the health of other people.

Working Journalist and Other News Paper Employee’s (Conditions of Service) and Miscellaneous Provisions Act, 1955 – Rule 3028

Maximum 30 days of quarantine leave can be availed by the employees covered under this Act.

Sales Promotion Employees (Conditions of Service) Act, 1976 – Rule 1629

An employee covered under this Act can avail maximum 30 days of quarantine leave on recommendations by authorized Medical Attendant or Public Health Officer.
Extraordinary Leave

Working Journalist and Other News Paper Employee’s (Conditions of Service) and Miscellaneous Provisions Act, 1955

Rule 3130

Extraordinary leave without wages may be granted to employees covered under this Act, by the newspaper establishment in which he is employed.

Sales Promotion Employees (Conditions of Service) Act, 1976 

A sales promotion employee may be granted extraordinary leave without wages at the discretion of the employer in special circumstances.

Apprentices Act, 1961 – Section 1531

An apprentice can avail extraordinary leave upto a maximum period of 10 days in a year.
Study Leave/Sabbatical Leave

Study leave/sabbatical leave is granted to an employee to pursue higher studies with a guarantee to resume them in job on completion of the leave. Such leaves are granted to an employee in accordance with company policies and may be paid or unpaid sabbatical leave. The sabbatical leave would be exclusively for scientific or academic work at any relevant institution in India or abroad. The facility of sabbatical leave may be extended to include work on other activities of the innovation chain with industry, consultancy organizations, financial institutions, project engineering firms, technology marketing/transfer agencies, etc.

Working Journalist and Other News Paper Employee’s (Conditions of Service) and Miscellaneous Provisions Act, 1955

Rule 33

The Rule provides for grant of study leave with or without wages at discretion of the employer.

Sales Promotion Employees (Conditions of Service) Act, 1976

Any employee covered under the Act may be granted study leave with or without wages in accordance with the company policies.
Leave Not Due

Where an employee has no leave to his credit and he/she still requires leave, such leave may be granted at the discretion of the employer.
Working Journalist and Other News Paper Employee’s (Conditions of Service) and Miscellaneous Provisions Act, 1955 – Rule 3233

A working journalist who has no leave to his credit may be granted leave at the discretion of the newspaper establishment in which such working journalist is employed.

Sales Promotion Employees (Conditions of Service) Act, 1976 

A sales promotion employee, who has no leave to his credit, may be granted leave not due at the discretion of the employer.
Leave For General/Bye Election For Parliament And State Assemblies34

During the general elections in the country or the state where the employee is residing he is eligible for leave on the polling day. For general elections of Lok Sabha and Vidhan Sabha or any of the bye election one day leave is been declared to all employees for the polling day. (Sec.3A of Karnataka Industrial Establishments (National and Festival Holidays) Act, 1963)35

Under Industries Association Act, 1963 Section 3 (A) also there is a provision for such leave.

For Central Government employees provision for such leave differs for each election details of which can be checked as under given table36 :

II. Bye-Elections –
(i) Lok Sabha
II. (a) Holiday/Closure of offices State Government normally declares a local holiday in that particular area/constituency on the polling day (s) if the election is held on day (s) other than Sunday/or other closed holidays. Central Government offices may also follow the State practice in such cases.

(b) Grant of Special Casual Leave-
Permissible on the same grounds/circumstances as in the case of general elections [of I(b) above.]

(ii) State Assemblies (a) Holiday/closure of offices- In bye-election to State Assemblies, Central Government offices should not be closed. It would be sufficient if only those Central Government employees who may be placed on election duty are permitted to absent themselves from office on the polling day (s). All other employees should be given facility to excise their franchise either by way of coming late to office or by being allowed to leave office early or a short absence on that day, subject to the exigencies of the services.

(b) Grant of Special Casual Leave- Permissible on the grounds/circumstances as in the case of general elections. (of I(b) above.)

III.Panchayat/Corporation. /Municipalities or other- local bodies III. The Central Government-offices shall not be closed. The Government employees who are bonfire voters and desire to exercise their franchise should however, offered reasonable facility, subject to the normal exigencies of service, either by way of coming late to office or by being allowed to leave office early or a short absence on that day.

Innovative Leave

Human Resource department of every company deals with employees and to maintain a healthy and friendly relation with them. They work as a bridge between employees and management. As the competition in the labour market is high to find and retain skilled employees HR department of various companies other than the legal leaves also are coming up with various innovative leaves. Some of the examples of these leaves adopted by different companies to provide benefit to their employees are as follows:

Bereavement Leave37

This leave is a grant paid time off from work to employees for the death of a relative. Employees are eligible for up to 7 days leave, if necessary, in the event of the death of an immediate family member (defined as parents, grandparents, siblings, spouse, children and in-laws). This leave is generally provided for the demise of close relative, and depends on the policies framed by the organisation. This leave is not legally entitled but is an innovative approach of HR policies in some of the private firms.

Birthday Leave38

In Bharti Airtel company a half day leave is been provided to the employee for the celebration of Birthday.

Employee Volunteering Leave39

Employee volunteering leave is a leave been granted to an employee to participate in volunteer for a charity. Bharti Airtel Company provides one day paid leave to its employee for volunteering work.

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Posted by on April 19, 2014 in Human Resource Policies

 

Employee Local, Domestic and International Business Travel Policy


Purpose:

 

  1. To ensure all a clear and consistent understanding of policies and procedures for business travel
  2. To provide business travelers with a reasonable level of service and comfort at the lowest possible cost
  3. To maximize the ability to negotiate discounted rates with corporate travel agency and reduce travel expenses
  4. To provide management with a reporting/tracking tool for staff travel expenses.

Policy guideline

 

This policy covers expenses reimbursements and entitlements thereof for employees who travel to meet company’s business requirements, or are deputed to attend professional meetings /conferences / workshops /training programs or Temporary/ Permanent projects / engagements.

Employee Local, Domestic and International Business Travel Process

Refer to the Standard Operating Process

Important Note

 

  1. The policy guidelines have been laid down with the expectation that employees will ensure that:
    1. The expenses claimed and sanctioned are reasonable.
    2. All claims for reimbursements are made on the basis of reasonable expenses actually incurred towards boarding, lodging, conveyance and miscellaneous expenses.
  2. The employees are expected to preserve their railway/air tickets and other bills so as to claim the reimbursement.

Remarks

 

  1. All expenses must be fully supported with paid bills and duly authorized by the Reporting Manger. Cash items less than Rs.500 would be considered with Reporting Manager’s Approval.
  1. The responsibility of correctly filling a claim voucher will, therefore, entirely rest with the claimant.  Any breach in any form of this trust will render the employee to very strict disciplinary action.
  1. While traveling on company business, if an employee avails casual, sick or privilege leave, he will not be entitled to reimbursements of any allowances for the period of leave.
  1. The Company is not responsible for tickets lost prior to their use. The employee will be required to replace the ticket at his/her own expense if the ticket is lost prior to the trip.
  1. Any deviations from the traveling rules require specific approval from the VP / SVP in writing.

Confidentiality

 

It is the responsibility of Accounts, HR, the Reporting Manager (or her/his nominee) and the Employee, to ensure the confidentiality in respect to the travel and the reimbursement.

Documentation

 

At all stages of the Travel process, it is the responsibility of the Employee and the Reporting Manager to handover all the necessary documents to Accounts.  Accounts is to ensure that notes are kept detailing with the reason for travel.  A compiled copy of the aforesaid notes should be in custody of HR / Admin for updating attendance record. These notes could be called upon in support of the Travel process.  The notes should therefore be relevant to, and necessary for the process itself.

 
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Posted by on January 13, 2013 in Human Resource Policies

 

Employee Exit Policy


 

Purpose

 

  1. To improve working conditions and retain employees.
  2. To gain valuable information/feedback on the specific job of the departing employee and organization, to relevantly make positive changes based on the inputs.

 

Policy Guidelines

 

Before the exit of an employee, an exit interview is to be executed. An exit interview is typically a meeting between HR and a departing employee. HR will ask the employee to complete a questionnaire and while taking notes also will asks the employee to some questions related to the exit of the employee.

 

HR Role

HR conducts an exit interviews (also called exit surveys) to gather data for exit of an employee. This information is important for to attain the attrition rate of the organisation

 

Exit Process

Refer to the Standard Operating Process

 

Confidentiality

 

In the Process, all exit interview details are treated with the utmost confidentiality.  It is the responsibility of HR and the Reporting Manager (or her/his nominee) to ensure that suitable arrangements are made for confidentiality to be maintained.

 

Documentation:

 

At all stages of the exit process, it is the responsibility of the Reporting Manager, the HR and the Finance to ensure that notes are kept detailing with the reason for exit of the Employee.  These notes could be called upon as evidence of the fairness of the process, either to support the exit of the employee or the attrition rate of the company.  The notes should therefore be relevant to, and necessary for the process itself.  All records must be with HRD.

 
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Posted by on January 13, 2013 in Human Resource Policies

 

Employee Probation & Confirmation Policy


Purpose 

  1. To establish whether there is an appropriate match between the employee, the job, and the work environment.
  2. To establish whether a good working atmosphere exists within the work group.
  3. Employee confirmation follows a successful probation.

Policy Guidelines

Before the end of the probation period specified in the employee’s appointment letter, a decision must be made as to whether the employee should continue in employment with the organisation. In the event of an employee not meeting the probation criteria (outlined elsewhere), appropriate action, including extension of probation or termination, will be initiated.

HR Role

 The HR may act in an advisory capacity to any party and/or as an independent facilitator. HR is the only one point moderator between the parties.

Confirmation Process

Refer to the Standard Operating Process

Confidentiality

In the Confirmation Process, the feedback and the discussion that ensued between different parties should be treated with utmost confidentiality. It is the responsibility of HR, the Reporting Manager (or her/his nominee) and the Employee, to ensure this confidentiality.

Documentation:

 At all stages of the Confirmation process, it is the responsibility of the Reporting Manager to handover all the necessary documents to HR.  HR will ensure detailed notes / minutes in respect of discussions pertaining to probation extension / confirmation are maintained. These documents will be called upon as evidence of the fairness of the process, either as an internal review or to support the confirmation process.  The notes should therefore be relevant to, and necessary for the process itself.

 
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Posted by on January 12, 2013 in Human Resource Policies

 

Internal Job Hiring Policy


Internal Job Hiring Policy

Purpose

 

  1.  The performance level of an internal hire is generally better than external hires in firms that are successful and stable.
  2. To encourage the development and advancement of current employees.
  3. To shorten the recruitment process
  4. To reduce the cost of recruitment
  5. An Internal Placement could result in multiple internal promotions, each of these vacancies can act as a motivator
  6. It allows increased access to available vacancies within the Company and provides empowerment to employees for taking ownership of their own careers.

Policy Guidelines

 

It is the policy of our organization, which is to establish and adhere to standard Internal Job Posting Procedures. This guide is a brief summary of the key points central to conducting a successful internal search. It is the policy, that recruitment for internal staff positions reflects a balanced commitment to equal employment opportunity, affirmative action, good personnel management practices, towards the mission and goals of our organization.

HR Role

 

The HR may act in an advisory capacity to any party and/or as an independent facilitator. HR is not in a position to make decisions, but may offer recommendations for resolution

Internal Job Hiring

Refer to the Standard Operating Process

 

Confidentiality

 In the Process, all application details are treated with the utmost confidentiality.  It is the responsibility of HR and the Reporting Manager (or her/his nominee) to ensure that suitable arrangements are made for confidentiality to be maintained.

Documentation

 At all stages of Internal Hiring Process, it is the responsibility of the Chair of the panel to ensure that notes are kept detailing, with the reason for selection or rejection of candidate request.  These notes could be called upon as evidence of the fairness of the process, either through an internal assessment or to support an external investigation.  The notes should therefore be relevant to, and necessary for the process itself.  It should be noted that applicants would normally be entitled to have access to interview notes about them which are retained as part of the record of the interview.  All records must be handed to HRD by the Chair of the panel.

 

Ref: http://www.citehr.com/29555-internal-job-posting.html

 
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Posted by on January 11, 2013 in Human Resource Policies

 

Manpower Planning Policy


Purpose

  • To identify the current and future manpower needs
  • To have a proper utilization of workforce which can help save money now, and as you plan for your company’s future.
  • To recruit quality manpower at all levels in terms of knowledge, skills, attitude and character without any discrimination on the basis of age, sex, religion, nationality or caste.
  • To operate an economically flourishing business, so there exist consistent level of work and equal opportunity to grow.
  • To increase work productivity.

Policy Guidelines

It is the policy of our organization, which is to establish and adhere to standard manpower planning procedures. This guide is a brief summary of the key points central to conducting a successful manpower plan.

HR Role

The HR plays a huge role in the process development of Manpower planning. HR is in a position to make decisions, in coordination to organisational goals and development. Other department heads / Managers may offer recommendations for resolution.

Manpower Planning Process

Refer to the Standard Operating Process

Documentation

 At all stages of Manpower Planning process, it is the responsibility of the Chair of the panel to ensure that notes are kept detailing, with the reason for projecting manpower with their respected duties and responsibilities.  These notes could be called upon as evidence of the fairness of any process, either through an internal assessment or to support an external investigation.  The notes should therefore be relevant to, and necessary for the process itself.  It should be noted that employees would normally be entitled to have access to the positions open for recruitment, for the subsequent months as decided by the Chair Panel. All records must be handed to HRD by the Chair of the panel.

Ref: http://www.scribd.com/doc/52125200/45/Manpower-Planning-Policy

Ref: http://smallbusiness.chron.com/objectives-manpower-planning-11663.html

 
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Posted by on January 11, 2013 in Human Resource Policies

 

Sample – Employee handbook template


Table of contents

1. INTRODUCTION

•     Welcome from leadership team

•     Information about the organisation

•     Mission/values

•     Strategic plan

•     Organisational chart and national structure

2. JOINING THE ORGANISATION

•     Signing up – forms to complete

•     Working hours

•     Access to building/car parking

•     Business Cards

•     Dress code

3. REMUNERATION AND BENEFITS

•     Salary and wage payments

•     Salary review process

•     Salary deductions

•     Time in lieu policy

4. TRAVEL POLICY (within NZ and overseas)

•     Authorisation and bookings

•     Use of credit cards

•     Expense reimbursement

•     Personal effects/insurance

5. VEHICLE POLICY

•     Use of company cars

•     Use of own car – reimbursement

6. PERFORMANCE DEVELOPMENT

•     Annual appraisal process

•     Performance Development Plan

•     Competencies

•     Training and development – study support

7. CODE OF CONDUCT

•     Conflict of interest

•     Confidentiality

•     Copyright and protection of intellectual property

•     Dealing with media/giving interviews

•     Privacy relating to treatment of personal information

8. DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURES

•     Disciplinary action

•     Resolving employment relationship problems

9. EMPLOYMENT RELATED POLICIES

•     Equal employment opportunity (EEO)

•     Discrimination and harassment

•     Health and safety

•     Parental leave

•     Smoking in the workplace

•     Abandonment of employment

•     Alcohol and drugs

•     Internet/email/phone usage

•     Community services leave – volunteering in our community

•     Jury service

10.   LEAVING PROCEDURES

•     Return of company property

•     Exit Interviews

•     Employee references

11.   SPORTS SPECIFIC POLICIES

An area dedicated to sport specific issues (ie process to follow in the event of emergency while athletes are abroad)

1.   INTRODUCTION

•     Welcome from the leadership team

Insert welcome notes from the leadership team here (CEO/Chairperson). You may like to include an overview of how the Board is formed, their governance role and the value of the Management/Board relationship.

•     Information about the organisation

Insert information regarding the history of the organisation. It is helpful for new employees to understand where the organisation has come from in order for them to connect with the next phase which they will be part of.

•     Mission/values

Insert the organisation’s mission statement, vision and values of the organisation. This will most likely come from the Strategic Plan.

•     Strategic plan

Select key points from the current strategic plan and insert here. Identify the period of time that the Strategic plan covers. You may wish to include the progress that you have made or how the Strategic plan was set.

•     Organisational chart and national structure

Insert a current organisation chart. Depending on the size of your organisation or amount of employee turnover will determine if you include names adjacent to the job role. It will be helpful to see how your organisation fits with the sport across the country (diagrams are an effective way to demonstrate this).

2.   JOINING THE ORGANISATION

•     Signing up – forms to complete

List the forms that need to be signed at the outset of the employment relationship.

Advise that they must be completed as soon as possible and returned to the relevant manager in order that their salary may be paid. The forms may include:

•     personal and bank account details;

•     completed IR33 tax form;

•     emergency information form; and

•     declaration agreeing to employment terms and conditions.

•     Working hours

Include a statement regarding your policy on working hours. It may follow these lines:

“{Organisation name}’s normal office hours are from {am} to {pm} with an hour taken for lunch at an agreed time. There may be times when you are required to work outside these hours. Overtime payments are not paid unless specified in an individual employment agreement. Your working hours may be varied from time to time by mutual agreement.”

•     Access to building/car parking

Outline here your organisation’s approach to accessing the building both during and outside office hours. This may include use of relevant keys and/or access cards, as well as security systems/alarms. If a car park is included as part of an employee’s package then you could also document here the procedure for accessing the car park during and out of office hours, if appropriate.


•     Dress code

This section allows you to clearly outline to your employees how you expect them to dress for work, both at events and in the office environment. For example:

“{Organisation name} operates a smart casual dress policy. This means that we expect that all employees dress in a neat manner appropriate to:

•     the work they are doing;

•     the clients they are dealing with; and

•     what is typical within {organisation name}’s culture.

The overriding consideration is that you look smart and professional at all times and that you dress appropriately for the occasion. Dress down Fridays are acceptable practice with exception to the above.”

3.   REMUNERATION AND BENEFITS

•     Salary and wage payments

Outline here your approach to paying employee salaries/wages. This may follow the lines of:

“The salary or wage which has been agreed with you individually will be outlined in your employment agreement and should be regarded as confidential. You should not disclose your salary or wages to anyone within the organisation other than your immediate manager. Full details of the breakdown of your salary or wage payment will be shown on your payslip which will be given to you on, or just before, payday. Your salary or wages are accrued throughout the month and paid in arrears twice per month on or around the {date} and {date} of the month into your nominated bank account.”

•     Salary review process

Provide your employees with an outline of how salaries are reviewed in your organisation. The following is suggested wording:

“Your salary or wage will be reviewed annually in {month} and adjusted in line with your performance. The salary review process will take into account your performance in your role, market rates for you role and {organisation name}’s ability to pay. Reviews will not necessarily lead to an increase”.

If your organisation offers a variable pay component then an outline of how this process works could also be inserted in this section. Suggested wording is as follows:

“Some employees are offered a variable remuneration incentive as part of their salary package. The criteria is articulated in the Performance Plan and based upon achievement of specific outputs within the period to which it relates. The assigned salary level will be reviewed annually following completion of the annual performance review process. This is however no guarantee of an increase following any review. Any potential increase will be dependent on your assessed performance and {organisation name}’s economic performance.”

•     Salary deductions

As a rule, you as an employer should not make deductions from employees’ wages, unless:

•     the employee has given their written consent;

•     the employee has been absent from work without your authority (you must still notify the employee of the deduction);

•     the employment agreement requires a deduction (e.g. deduction of union fees);

•     a Court directs a deduction be made; or

•     they are required by law (e.g. IRD, tax payment, child support etc).

Therefore your employee handbook could specify something along the lines of:

“No deductions will be made from your salary without your authorisation, except for time lost through special leave, default, and accident or through absence at your request and with our consent”.

•     Time in lieu policy

If your organisation does not pay overtime, but requires employees to work weekends, then you may wish to implement a time in lieu policy. Suggested wording is as follows:

“As {organisation name}’s business sometimes falls outside the normal Monday to Friday working week, time in lieu may be allowed for every day of work undertaken in the weekends or statutory holidays on behalf of {organisation name}, away from the office. Time in lieu is to be approved by the Chief Executive before the work is undertaken and should be taken within the quarter it is accumulated. Time in lieu may be accumulated up to a maximum of (number) days only. No payment will be made for any time in lieu on termination of employment”.

4.   TRAVEL POLICY (within NZ and overseas)

•     Authorisation and bookings

You may have employees who are required to travel both within NZ and overseas as part of their role. Insert information here about who is responsible for authorising and booking their travel and accommodation. You could also detail any preferred supplier agreements that you have with travel agents, airlines, accommodation options etc.

•     Use of credit cards

Regardless of whether you issue company cards (or require employees to use their own personal credit card) to manage their company related expenses when travelling, you will need to give clear guidelines as to how they can use these cards. This will include:

•     what they can purchase with the card (e.g. meals, accommodation, drinks, snacks, transport) and the limits set on these items;

•     what they cannot purchase with the card (e.g. entertainment, gifts, personal items);

•     the way in which they can gain reimbursement for expenses, including who to submit expense requests to and the need to provide personal receipts;

•     who can approve expense requests, and whether approval is required before or after spending occurs;

•     the credit limit (company credit cards); and

•     the requirement to limit the use of the cash advance facility (as there is no interest free period for cash advances on credit cards).

•     Expense reimbursement

Insert your organisation’s policy with regard to expense reimbursement here. This should cover things like;

•     claiming for meals, snacks and drinks: – (you can set a limit per day or per meal to make it very clear) and use of hotel mini bars, in house entertainment etc; and

•     telephone and internet charges in hotels, plus mobile phone use: – provide some guidelines as to what is acceptable usage and ways to reduce costs here (e.g. limit use of hotel internet connections, restrict outgoing mobile phone calls when overseas, restrict use of hotel telephones etc).

You should include information regarding the procedure for gaining approval for expenses, who to submit the expense reimbursement to and the timeframe for submitting expenses. For example:

“Where expenses have been incurred in the performance of your duties, and provided that you have obtained your manager’s approval to incur the expense, {organisation name} will reimburse you for all reasonable travel and other expenses incurred as part of undertaking your role. You should submit all receipts in accordance with the expenses claimed. Please note that, where expenses are submitted to {organisation name} for repayment more than {number} months after the expense is incurred, the expense may not be reimbursed.”


•     Personal effects/insurance

You will need to outline to employees your organisation’s approach to insurance for them if they are travelling on work related business. An example of how you may approach this is as follows:

“If you travel overseas on {organisation name}’s business, travel insurance will be provided. Insurance is not provided for travel within New Zealand, therefore you are responsible for your personal effects when travelling nationwide.”

5.   VEHICLE POLICY

•     Use of company cars

Some of your employees may receive a company car as part of their package. You should include in this handbook your policy with regard to use of company cars. It is useful to include information and reminders about:

•     whether the car is for company related business only or whether the employee can also use it for personal use;

•     the importance of remaining fully qualified to drive with a current full drivers license;

•     ensuring that the conditions of any insurance policy are observed;

•     taking good care of the vehicle and ensuring it is serviced as per requirements;

•     not allowing anyone else to drive the car unless they have permission from {organisation name};

•     not driving the car in an illegal manner (e.g. under the influence of alcohol, speeding etc); and

•     the requirement for the employee to pay for any traffic infringement fines that are incurred while driving the car.

•     Use of own car – reimbursement

There will be times when employees use their own car for work related business. This can be preferable as often it will be more cost effective than taking taxis or flying. If this is the case for your organisation, then you will need to outline how employees can reclaim costs associated with using their own car. Suggested wording is as follows:

“If you use your own car for {organisation name} business then the following
will apply:

•     mileage for {organisation name} business will be paid at Inland Revenue approved rates for NZ travel;

•     parking, towing and traffic fines (e.g. speeding) will not be reimbursed; and

•     car parking costs will be reimbursed for business related parking as long as a receipt is submitted in line with the expense reimbursement procedure.”

6.   PERFORMANCE DEVELOPMENT

•     Annual appraisal process

Insert here your organisation’s approach to the annual performance appraisal process including, who is involved, the employee’s role, when and how often it is done and what the purpose of the appraisal process is. It may be along the lines of:

“The aim of our performance appraisal process is to provide you with guidance, to help you to achieve your job and career goals, to recognise your achievements and to ensure {organisations name}’s strategic and business goals are achieved. You will have the opportunity to participate in planning your work and setting your goals in conjunction with your manager on a regular basis and formally during your annual appraisal meeting. Your manager will provide you with regular coaching and feedback. The performance appraisal process is an opportunity for two way communication and honest feedback about your work and your future career with {organisation name}.”


•     Performance Development Plan (PDP)

Insert here a reference to the PDP. This is the template which is used to set Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and assess performance against these KPIs, and your organisation’s competencies. A copy of the PDP should be inserted into each employee’s induction pack so they know the way in which their KPIs will be set and how performance in their role will be assessed.

NB: Please refer to the SPARC website for a copy of the PDP template.

•     Competencies

If your organisation has identified a group of generic competencies (based on your organisation’s core values) you could insert these in this section. Competencies are those behaviours that apply across the organisation and typify the expected standards or norms of behaviours for all roles and all individuals in the organisation.

•     Training and development – study support

This section should focus on your organisation’s approach to providing your employees with training and development opportunities. It may cover your policy with regard to employees attending training courses (e.g. how many in
a year, and/or training spend per person), who can authorise training and study support (i.e. time off to attend lectures, payment for relevant courses of study).
A suggested approach to this is as follows:

“{Organisation name} sees the training and development of its employees as essential to achieving its goals. You are invited to discuss your training needs during your formal performance appraisal meeting or with your immediate manager at any time. Your manager is responsible for approving all training or courses of study.

If you wish to pursue a course of academic study relevant to the needs of {organisation name} and your role within it, please discuss this with your manager. If it is seen to be beneficial to {organisation name} then study support may be given with the approval of the Chief Executive. All study must be conducted in your own time, and special leave may be approved for time off to study, however this will be at the discretion of the Chief Executive. If {organisation name} financially contributes to your course of study, and you leave with 12 months of completing the course, {organisation name} reserves the right to recoup any monies owing.”

7.   CODE OF CONDUCT

•     Conflict of interest

Insert here your policy relating to conflict of interest (i.e. unacceptable business practices, interests or influences which may interfere with an employee’s best judgement in the performance of their job, and/or secondary employment). An example of how you may word this is as follows:

“During your employment, you must not undertake any activity or have any interest (e.g. memberships, directorships, shares, or contract) with any person or in any organisation which may constitute a conflict of interest with {organisation name}. You must notify your manager at {organisation name} immediately upon becoming aware of any potential or actual conflict of interest involving them during your employment. Any work undertaken with other organisations must have the approval of the Chief Executive to ensure it does not interfere or create a conflict with your main employment with {organisation name}.”

•     Confidentiality

It is important to remind your employees of their responsibilities in relation to the use (or misuse) of confidential information as follows:

“In the course of your employment you may come in contact with or have access to confidential information. Such information is strictly confidential and must not be used or divulged (directly or indirectly) by you, either during or after your employment with {organisation name}. A breach of confidentiality is a very serious matter and may be grounds for your dismissal.”


•     Copyright and protection of intellectual property

Insert here your policy relating to protection of your organisation’s intellectual property. An example is as follows:

“You agree that you are not entitled to any copyright or moral right in or arising from any work you produce in the course of your employment with {organisation name}. This includes any program, strategy or system you develop during your employment with {organisation name}. Any copyright or merchandising rights in such work shall be the sole and exclusive property of {organisation name} in accordance with the Copyright Act 1994.”

•     Dealing with media/giving interviews

Insert here a comment relating to the process to follow when employees are dealing with the media. For example:

“The approval of the Chief Executive must be obtained before any written material is submitted to the media or any interview given.”

•     Privacy relating to the treatment of personal information

Insert here a comment about how you as an organisation protect the personnel records and personal information of your employees. For example:

“Your personnel records are kept by the {job title}. A summary of the information held is kept on {e.g. computer database}. Access to this information can be obtained through your manager.”

8.   DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURES

Insert here a reference to the procedures which you as an organisation will follow if a disciplinary issue arises within your organisation. Suggested wording is as follows:

•     Disciplinary action

{Organisation name} may invoke these procedures in a situation where there is, for example; inadequate performance, misconduct, a breach of the employment agreement and/or employee handbook. The organisation will:

Step 1. Give a formal written warning, the details of which will be placed on your file. The warning will remain on file unless {organisation name} decides to remove it.

Step 2. Give a final warning if the formal written warning is not heeded or there is further misconduct or poor performance. This will state that further poor performance or misconduct will result in dismissal. This warning will also remain on file unless {organisation name} decides to remove it.

Step 3. Dismiss you, either summarily or on notice, if the final warning is not heeded, or if there is further poor performance or misconduct.

Where serious misconduct is deemed to have occurred you may be dismissed without notice and without payment in lieu of notice. Examples of serious misconduct may include, but are not limited to:

(a)  Any material breach of the terms of the employment agreement or employee handbook;

(b)  Any dishonesty or theft;

(c)  Any situation where you commit any act of bankruptcy, become insolvent, or compounds with or attempts to compound with any creditors of you;

(d)  Any situation where you behave in a manner likely to bring you, or {organisation name}, into disrepute;

(e)  Falsification of {organisation name} records;

(f)   Wilful damage of {organisation name} property;

(g)  Any situation where you take unauthorised absence from work;

(h)  Any acts of violence, threatened violence or harassment against another person whilst in the course of duties for {organisation name};

(i)   Being drunk or using illegal substances or drugs whilst on {organisation name} business;

(j)   Wrongfully disclosing {organisation name} information; and

(k)  The inappropriate use of electronic media, including pcs, internet.

•     Resolving employment relationship problems

The Employment Relations Act (2000) requires all employers to provide their employees with a plain language explanation of the services available for resolution of employment relationship problems. An example is as follows:

The following are the options available to employees who believe there is an employment relationship problem.

•     {Organisation name} encourages employees to check their facts before taking things further.

•     Discuss the apparent problem with family or friends or advisers, and find out what the law is and/or what the employment agreement says. For additional information:

–    Contact the Employment Relations Info line – Call free 0800 800 863.

–    Visit the website at http://www.ers.dol.govt.nz;

–    Get pamphlets/fact sheets from Employment Relations Service offices; or

–    Talk to a lawyer, community law office or industrial relations consultant.

•     Employees are encouraged to talk to their manager or an appropriate person in the organisation. It is ideal if we can solve our own problems quickly and fairly wherever possible.

•     If the problem can’t be solved internally, a Mediation Service run by the Department of Labour can be accessed. The Mediation Service provides information about employment rights and obligations, as well as providing impartial mediators to help solve the problem.

•     If the Mediation Service does not provide a solution, the Employment Relations Authority may be approached for help. Employees taking this more formal step may wish to have someone representing them. The Authority will investigate the problem and make a decision.

•     If the decision is not satisfactory to the employee, the problem can then be taken to the Employment Court or ultimately to the Court of Appeal.

•     If an employee has a personal grievance it must be raised within 90 days after the action complained of, or the date the employee became aware of it (unless there are exceptional circumstances as outlined by the Employment Relations Authority).

•     If an employee believes they have a personal grievance based on discrimination or sexual harassment they may be able to make a complaint under the Human Rights Act. A personal grievance can’t be referred to both the Human Rights Commission and the Employment Relations Authority.

•     If the problem is about minimum entitlements under the law, a Labour Inspector can be contacted to enforce employee rights under minimum rights legislation, such as the Minimum Wage Act or the Holidays Act.

9.   EMPLOYMENT RELATED POLICIES

•     Equal employment opportunity (EEO)

If your organisation already has an EEO policy then insert it in this section of the handbook so all employees are aware of your policy in this area. If you do not have a policy then a sample EEO policy statement follows:

“{Organisation name} aims to be an equal opportunity employer and is committed to promoting equal opportunities regardless of religious belief, age, colour, race, creed, marital status, gender, sexual orientation, political affiliation, ethnic origin, family status or any disability you may have (subject to the exceptions contained in the Human rights Act 1993). This commitment applies to all areas of the work environment, all employment activities, resource allocation and all employment terms and conditions. Selection criteria and procedures aim to ensure that employees are selected, promoted, and treated on the basis of their relevant merits and abilities.”


•     Discrimination and harassment policy

As above, if your organisation has a policy in this area you may insert it in this section. If not, then you can use the policy outlined below:

“Employees need not tolerate harassment in the workplace. If any staff member feels they have been subjected to any form of harassment (sexual, racial, political, social, or religious) it may be discussed (confidentially) with the Chief Executive or your Manager. Harassment is not condoned or tolerated in any way and may lead to dismissal or to other appropriate action being taken in respect of the person conducting such behaviour. “

What is discrimination?

Under the Human Rights Act it is illegal to discriminate on the basis of age, sex, sexual orientation, race, disability, family, marital or employment status, political opinion, religion, and ethnic origin.

What is harassment?

Inappropriate behaviour that makes a person feel offended, humiliated or intimidated at work and leaves them feeling their work performance and morale has been negatively affected. Harassment may include bullying, intimidation, insults, malicious gossip, insults and/or victimisation.

What is sexual harassment?

Sexual harassment is behaviour of a sexual nature (including the use of words, actions or visual material) that is unwanted by the receiver and has a detrimental effect on their work, performance or job satisfaction. Examples are:

•     sexual assault

•     uninvited touching

•     smutty jokes or comments

•     making promises or threats in return for sexual favours

•     obscene or pornographic email messages, images, items

•     inappropriate or excessive comments on clothing or physical characteristics; and

•     unwelcome social attention or telephone calls at home or work

How to deal with discrimination or harassment

Any person who is being discriminated against or harassed has the right to complain and take action to stop this behaviour. If you experience harassment or discrimination you should:

•     complain about the behaviour: this can include telling the person(s) discriminating against you or harassing you that the situation is unacceptable; and

•     report the matter to your manager or to any other member of management, if you feel that you are unable to speak to the person yourself. Your complaint will be attended to in a completely confidential manner.

•   Health and safety

Insert information on health and safety in the workplace in this section. There are a number of ways you could approach this.

If you already have a health and safety booklet for employees you can refer to the booklet here and include a copy in all employee induction packs;

If you don’t have a health and safety booklet you can refer to the sample booklet in appendix 8 of this managers’ toolkit which provides guidelines to help you put a booklet together; or

You could insert a policy statement which outlines your organisation’s approach to health and safety. An example of the key things to convey to employees is as follows:

“{Organisation name} will take all steps necessary to ensure that your health and safety is protected at all times.

As your employer it is our responsibility to:

•     identify, manage and control hazards to establish safe work practices;

•     provide information to foster awareness of health and safety;

•     provide protective clothing and equipment as required;

•     make adequate preparations for emergencies;

•     record all accidents and “near misses” and investigate where necessary to ensure future accidents are avoided;

•     ensure you are properly trained and supervised to do your work in a healthy and safe manner; and

•     provide reasonable opportunities for you to be involved in health and safety.

As an employee it is your responsibility to:

•     contribute to the process of hazard identification, analysis and control;

•     ensure all work accidents and illnesses are reported and recorded;

•     use any protective clothing and equipment provided;

•     not undertake any work which is unsafe;

•     look out for the safety of fellow employees; and

•     observe all workplace safety rules and hazard controls.

Any accident or injury at work should be brought to the attention of your health and safety representative {name}, or your manager, and recorded in the accident register which can be located in {insert where the accident register is kept}.

In the event of a fire or emergency our building evacuation procedures are as follows: {insert detailed evacuation procedures here}

The fire exits are located {specify location} and our fire warden is {name}. In the event of a building evacuation the designated meeting point is {specify location}.

First aid boxes are located in {insert where the first aid box is kept } and our trained first aider is {name}.

If you have any concerns about health and safety or any ideas about how health and safety can be improved, please discuss these with your health and safety representative or your manager.”

Parental leave

Insert here your organisation’s policy and procedure relating to parental leave. You should advise your employees of their minimum legal entitlements (outlined below) to parental leave. (As an organisation you can choose to be more generous than this with your employees). You should also let them know who they can liaise with in regard to taking parental leave (e.g. Manager, Chief Executive, or Office Manager). An example is as follows:

Parental leave is the right to take time off to look after, or make arrangements for, a child’s welfare at the time of birth or adoption of a child. Under the Parental Leave Act 2002 any woman or partner of a pregnant woman, who assumes or intends to assume care of the newborn child who, at the expected date of birth of the child, meets the eligibility criteria is entitled to parental leave.

There are different entitlements for leave depending on whether you have worked for us for an average of at least 10 hours per week (including 1 hour every week or 40 hours every month) for either:

•     the immediately preceding 6 months, or

•     the immediately preceding 12 months before the expected due date or
adoption of a child

There are 4 types of leave:

Special leave: if you are pregnant you are entitled to up to 10 days unpaid special leave during pregnancy. This is for pregnancy-related reasons, such as ante-natal classes or appointments with your doctor or midwife.

Maternity leave is available as follows:

•     maternity leave of up to 14 weeks is available if you qualify on the basis of the hours test for the previous 12 months of service

•     maternity leave of up to 13 weeks (rising to 14 weeks from 1 December 2005) is available if you qualify on the basis of the hours test for the previous six months service

In both cases maternity leave may be commenced up to 6 weeks before the date of birth or adoption at the choice of the employer.

Paternity leave is available as follows:

•     up to 2 weeks unpaid leave for the mother’s partner on the birth of
adoption of a child, if that partner meets the hours test for the previous
12 months of service.

•     up to one week unpaid leave for the mother’s partner on the birth or adoption of a child if that partner meets the hours test for the previous 6 months of service.

Paternity leave of 1 week may be extended where:

•     the mother transfers the entitlement to parental leave payments to the partner, in which case the period of partner’s/paternity leave is extended
to match the length of time the payment is received by the partner.

•     you adopt a child alone, or adopt jointly and are nominated as principally entitled to receive parental leave payments. The paternity leave is extended
to the lesser of 13 weeks or the time the employee receives the payment.

Extended leave of up to 52 weeks unpaid leave, less any maternity leave taken or period of extended partner’s/paternity leave taken, that can be shared between the parents, if you are both eligible. This leave is only available to those parents who have qualified for leave on the basis of the hours test for the previous 12 months of employment with their employer.

Each partner must take any period of extended leave in a continuous period. The leave can be taken at the same time or separately to suit the needs of the parents and the child.

General provisions

All leave must be taken in the first year after the birth or adoption. Leave can be taken for second and subsequent children provided you meet the eligibility criteria. However, you can’t be eligible for another period of parental leave unless the expected date of delivery or adoption is at least 12 months after your return to work from a previous period of parental leave.

Paid parental leave scheme

If you are eligible for parental leave you may also be entitled to a taxpayer funded payment for up to 13 weeks of the parental leave you take, increasing to 14 weeks on 1 December 2005. The payment can be taken by one parent, or shared between two eligible partners.

The payment for parental leave replaces an employee’s wages or salary up to a maximum amount. For current rates please refer to the parental leave section of the government website http://www.ers.dol.govt.nz. Like wages or salary, the payment is taxed.

How do I apply for parental leave and payments?

You should apply for parental leave in writing at least three months before your baby is due, specifying the type of leave you wish to take. A doctor’s certificate certifying pregnancy and the expected date of delivery is also required.

Please refer to the website http://www.ers.dol.govt.nz/forms/employee.html for sample letters to help you apply for parental leave.

After your leave has been approved, we jointly complete the application form for Paid Parental Leave (IRD880) which can be found on http://www.ers.dol.govt.nz/forms/employee.html) and send this to IRD. {Organisation name} does not pay for your leave; it will be paid direct into your bank account each fortnight by the IRD.

Returning to work

You are required to give 3 weeks notice of your intention either to return or not return to work. 21 days notice is also required if you wish to return to work earlier than previously advised.

Will my position be held open?

Your position will be held open for you as long as you have the appropriate qualifying length of service.

Smoking in the workplace

This can simply and succinctly be summed up by advising all employees that:

“We operate in a non smoking workplace.”

Abandonment of employment

Insert a statement regarding how you will deal with employees who do not turn up to work for a number of consecutive days without notifying you as to the reasons why. An example is as follows:

“If you are absent from the office for five or more working days without notifying the firm you are deemed to have abandoned your employment.”

Alcohol and Drugs Policy

Insert here your policy that deals with difficulties at work that may be caused as a result of an employee’s misuse or dependency upon alcohol or drugs.

“Employees under the influence of drugs and alcohol can cause injury to themselves and others. {Organisation name} has a responsibility to ensure the health, safety and welfare at work of their employees and visitors. An employee whilst at work is prohibited from:

•    possessing or using illegal drugs at the workplace; and

•    being under the influence of drugs or alcohol

There is a range of medication which can affect performance, including pain relievers, sleeping pills, tranquillisers etc. An employee who is using legally prescribed medication that may impair performance is required to advise their manager of this.

It is every employee’s responsibility to take reasonable care of the health and safety of others in the workplace and ensure that their performance and actions are not impeded by the use of drugs (either legal or illegal) or alcohol. If you suspect that any employee is under the influence of drugs or alcohol, it is your responsibility to communicate this to {name and title}.”

Internet, email and phone policy

Insert here your organisation’s policy with regard to the use of the Internet, email and phones (mobile or otherwise). It is important to regulate email and internet access to avoid criminal or civil liability for any wrongdoing on the part of your employees. It is also important to ensure that you are very clear with employees about what constitutes acceptable usage of these workplace tools. An example of how you might approach this is as follows:

This policy establishes general guidelines for employees, students and volunteers as well as any other users who may be given access to {organisation name}’s computer and phone systems. These workplace tools are intended for business purposes.

Misuse of Internet, email and phones

{Organisation name}’s electronic media are not to be used for any unauthorised purposes, including;

•     The transmission of abusive, defamatory, obscene or racist communications

•     The searching for, perusal and /or downloading of pornographic or other objectionable material

•     Offensive material through the internet

•     The transmission of sensitive information about an individual or client

•     Where such transmission would, or would be likely to, place the company in breach of the Privacy Act 1993

Vandalism is any malicious attempt to harm or destroy data of another user or any other agencies or networks that are connected to the system. This includes but is not limited to, the uploading or creation of computer viruses.

Security

Users should never share access with someone else by giving him or her, your password. If this does occur, then you should alert system support, or change the password, to ensure that your computer files are not exposed to abuse. You are responsible for your own account and this means taking measures to ensure others cannot use it. Passwords are only effective if they are selected wisely; therefore your spouses’ name or your birth date are not acceptable. Passwords should always be longer than 5 characters.

You should ensure your PC is shut down correctly and turned off when you leave the office. This ensures unauthorised persons do not have access to the network in your absence.

Physical Security of Computer and Phones

You are asked to take reasonable steps to ensure the protection of your computer and phone including damage from improper use, food and drink spillage, and good housekeeping procedures.

Software Purchases and Copyright Infringement

All software used on {organisation name} computing systems is copyrighted. All purchases of new software must be approved by the Chief Executive. Software must not be copied unless the relevant license agreements allow it. You will not infringe the Copyright Act 1994. If you do, you will be held personally responsible for any such infringements.

Internet use

Only sites appropriate to {organisation name} should be visited. Browsing of
non-work related websites, or downloading of non-work related files should
be kept to a minimum as outlined below. Please use your best efforts to ensure that your use:

•     is kept to a minimum;

•     does not negatively impact upon your work performance or that of others;

•     does not damage the reputation or operations of {organisation name};

•     does not involve objectionable material (including but not limited to accessing or circulating items relating to terrorism, pornography, sexism or racism);

•     violate any acts of parliament or laws; and/or

•     result in your private gain.

{Organisation name} may, at any time, review, intercept, assess and disclose Internet usage. Users must comply with New Zealand copyright law and all other applicable laws.

Email use

Internet email allows you to access an enormous global community, and whilst email can be a powerful medium, messages are not protected in any way as they travel between correspondents. Therefore you should exercise good judgement and common sense when creating and distributing email messages. Care should also be taken to virus check all attachments.

Email messages must not contain offensive or objectionable material and the email system must not be used to send or receive, without prior authorisation, confidential information including but not limited to copyright materials, company, financial or personnel information or similar materials.

Personal use of email is allowed as long as you use your best efforts to ensure that your use:

•     is kept to a minimum;

•     does not negatively impact upon your work performance or that of others;

•     does not damage the reputation or operations of {organisation name};

•     does not involve objectionable material (including but not limited to accessing or circulating items relating to terrorism, pornography, sexism or racism);

•     violate any acts of parliament or laws; and/or

•     result in your private gain.

The email system belongs to {organisation name} and all email messages created, sent or received are the property of {organisation name}. Further you should be aware that there is no guarantee of privacy with an email message and that the firm reserves the right to access all aspects of employees’ email at any time for any reason without notice to the employee.

Mobile phone use

You may have been issued with a mobile phone for work use. You are asked to take reasonable steps to maintain the handset in good working condition. It is accepted that you may need to use this phone for personal use. It is asked that this be kept to a minimum during work hours. You will be sent the monthly phone bill and asked to identify (and pay for) those calls which are of a personal nature. Payments can be made by cash or cheque to {name}.

This Internet, email and phone policy may be amended or revised from time to time. You will be given written copies of all amendments and revisions to this policy. A breach of this policy may result in disciplinary action which could result in dismissal.

•     Community services leave – volunteering in our community

Insert here any policies you have relating to how your organisation supports the local community and how your employees can become involved in this. You may consider providing your employees with paid leave to help out in the community (e.g. one day of paid leave per employee per year). An example of how this may be worded is as follows:

“We have an important part to play in the community, which is why {organisation name} sponsors many different events and appeals every year. This help extends beyond just financial funding of community projects and initiatives. We endeavour to work closely with partner organisations to ensure their success, by providing support, such as the active involvement of {organisation name} employees as volunteers, whose time is paid for by {organisation name}. For more detail as to how we are involved with the communities of New Zealand please contact your manager. He/she will also explain how you can become involved and support these causes, and benefit from the opportunities offered.”


•     Jury service

This section outlines what the employee is required to do in the event he/she is required to perform jury service. An example is as follows:

“As soon as you are advised that you are required for jury service you should contact your manager. {Organisation name} will continue to pay your salary for the time you are on jury service. The money you receive from the Department of Courts (excluding travel allowance) it to be paid to {organisation name}.”

10.  LEAVING PROCEDURES

It is important to let your employees know what they are required to do and the things they are required to return when/if they leave your organisation. Examples of how you might do this are provided below:

•     Return of company property

“When you leave {organisation name} we ask that you:

•     return all company property including company car, mobile phones, computers, access cards and keys, company records, paperwork and documents, identification cards and any other relevant property;

•     hand over all current work to the appropriate people/person in order to ensure continuity of business/service; and

•     hand over to someone duly authorised to receive them all notes of confidential information which you may have acquired during your employment.

•     Exit Interviews

In this section you can outline to your employees your exit interview process. This can cover who will conduct the interview, its purpose and when it takes place.
For example:

“When you leave {organisation name} you will be invited to attend an exit interview. The interview will be scheduled in your last week with us. This is a confidential interview aimed at helping us to understand how we can improve our organisational performance. It focuses on aspects of our employment relationship with you including remuneration, training, working conditions, benefits, management practises etc. We aim to learn from your comments and use these to make improvements where appropriate.”

•     Employee references

Insert here your policy with regard to providing employee references. The most prudent approach to references is to simply provide a factual record of service outlining the employee name, job title, dates they were employed and a brief outline of their role. If a manager wishes to provide a personal comment they are able to do so but not in their capacity as a representative of the organisation (or on the company letterhead).

“Generally {organisation name} does not provide employee references but does provide a record of service, signed by the Chief Executive. If you have any queries, please contact your manager.”

11.  SPORTS SPECIFIC POLICIES

This is an area dedicated to sports specific issues (i.e. the process to follow in the event of an emergency while athletes are overseas).

DECLARATION:

Employee Name:           ___________________________________________________

I have received and read a copy of the Employee Handbook which I understand forms part of the Terms and Conditions of my employment.

Signed: _____________________________________________________________

Dated:  _____________________________________________________________

Please sign this page and return, together with your signed {offer letter/employment agreement} to {title and name}.

 
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Posted by on January 9, 2013 in Human Resource Policies